Tours, travels, hikes and journeys!

Posts tagged ‘trails’

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Liberty Lake Regional Park, Liberty Lake, WA


Liberty Lake Regional Park consists of 3, 591 acres of wetlands, lake shore, montane forest and irrigated lawns. This is a photo of the lake and swimming beach. All photos were taken by me. Join me on this walk!

There is a grassy area, next to the parking area, that has a playground, picnic shelters and BBQ areas.

There are many miles of trails, including the 8.3 mile Liberty Lake Loop trail.

There is an RV site, with hook ups, as well as regular campgrounds with showers and restrooms. These are in two different areas of the park.

There are even a couple cabins to rent.

As you hike on the trails you will pass wetlands.

You will pass by several beaver dams.

A turtle on a log.

Some pretty wild plants. I don’t know the name of these. If you do, please share in the comment section below.

Next to the large park, there is a 350 acre off road vehicle park with 16 miles of trails. Memorial day through Labor Day, there is a $2 per person fee for ages 6 and up. Children 5 and under are free. You can also purchase a Family season pass and non-profit rates are available, too. The campgrounds are open in a pre-season and post season, along with the summer season and reservations can be made for RV, tent and cabins online. This website has all the details:
https://www.spokanecounty.org/Facilities/Facility/Details/Liberty-Lake-Regional-Park-39
So if you are in the area, please check it out. The park is close to Liberty Lake town, with supplies available. It isn’t far from the I-90 freeway.

Thanks for joining me on the walk and taking the time to visit my blog!
Love, katelon

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Random Photos from around Coeur d’Alene, ID

I’ve been visiting lovely Coeur d’Alene, ID and love its beauty, friendliness, art scattered all about, and how easy it is to get around and explore the town and area.  Here are some random shots taken on my walks.

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The name “Coeur d’Alene” means “Heart of the Awl” , in French. The town was settled by French Trappers and they found the local natives to have tough trading practices. Heart of the Awl means Sharp-hearted.  This sculpture stands outside the visitors center on Sherman Ave.

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This B and B and event center, Roosevelt Inn, was the first schoolhouse, originally built in 1905. It is located at 105 E. Wallace Ave. , a few blocks north of Sherman, the main downtown street.

These stunning feather sculptures are located on Northwest Blvd. just south of the I-90 freeway. 

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If you walk west of the feather sculptures, you come to the Village of Riverstone, with condos, restaurants, stores and other businesses.  West of that is a man-made little lake, at Riverstone Park. There is a fountain, restrooms, a playground, benches and scupltures scattered around the park and lake. This whimsical sculpture caught my eye.

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West of that is a paved trail, Centennial Trail, that extends from Spokane, WA to CDA and a little southwest of it.  West of that trail is a gravel trail, and if you scramble down a ways west, you can find this little trail right next to the Spokane River.  It only goes south a ways until you come to the recently built homes and dock there.

Thanks for joining me on my journey and taking the time to read my blog!

Love, katelon

Mirabeau Point Park and More!

A few weeks ago I decided to explore Mirabeau Point Park, Mirabeau Meadows and Mirabeau Springs.  The location is in Spokane Valley, WA, 13500 E. Mirabeau Parkway.  The park itself is 55.51 acres, Mirabeau meadows is 10 acres, Mirabeau Springs is 7. 5 acres and Discovery playground is 1.5 acres.  There are paved, graveled, and natural trails all through the park.  The meadows have picnic tables and a covered shelter, parking , a stage and restrooms.  The playground has parking, picnic tables, covered shelters, a restroom and an outside classroom. Mirabeau Springs has a 40 foot waterfall and pond, a viewing dock, and a sheltered picnic table.

This is my favorite place here in Spokane, so far, to explore.  I love that even though roads and commercial buildings are right next to it, when you are on the trails, it feels like you are out in nature.  I hiked on the trails before the snow and after snow.  At first I wondered if I’d get lost but the trails intersect so smoothly and you can get your bearings so easily, that it leaves you free to just wander and not be concerned.  The area is very clean, too. I’m not a city person, so it is wonderful to have something so close to visit that makes it seem as if I’m out in some forest.  Given that it is winter, there were few other people there, too. 

It is just across the street from access to the Centennial Trail, a 37.5 mile long trail that stretches from the border of Idaho to west of downtown Spokane.  I have walked some on that trail and even though it runs alongside the Spokane River, it feels more manicured to me, and I could hear the sounds of the freeway.  Somehow, while hiking around Mirabeau Point park, I couldn’t hear the freeway sounds.  But it is nice that you can just cross Mirabeau parkway and access the long trail or go down to the river and enjoy that.   Many of the trails are ADA accessible. 

Here are some photos. You can click on them to enlarge them. I took all of them on my Samsung Galaxy phone.

Here is a photo of the springs and pond, frozen in the winter.

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Here is a view from Centennial Trail:

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And a couple more photos of the park:

When I explored on icy/snowy trails, I just stuck to the side of the trails to avoid the ice, and when scrambling up and down the natural trails, I just crouched down to grab hold of rocks along the way so I wouldn’t slide.  It’s great fun!

I found this great link where you can download a brochure that shows the walking trails and talks about the geology of the area:

http://laserfiche.spokanevalley.org/weblink8/0/doc/376648/Page1.aspx?cc=1

Here is a link that talks about the park.  Scroll down and you’ll get to Mirabeau Point park:

http://www.spokanevalley.org/content/6836/6910/8099/8625.aspx

And here is a link for the Centennial Trail:

https://www.traillink.com/trail/centennial-trail-state-park/#trail-detail-about

Thanks for joining me on another walk. I hope you are staying warm and dry during this stormy winter weather.  Thanks for taking the time to read my blog, like it, leave a comment, and follow along on this journey with me!

Love, katelon

Tecoloate Canyon Natural Park

The last couple weeks I’ve gone over to Tecolote Canyon to hike.  There are several places to enter this park and I came in via Tecolote Rd.  There is a parking area and a Nature Center there.  Inside there are some live snakes, many displays about snakes, vegetation, trees, rocks, the geological make up and history of the canyon and much more.  There is a classroom there that offers classes as well as various events that happen there such as birding walks and other activities,  and workshops, even yoga classes.   It is located at 5180 Tecolote Rd., San Diego, CA, 92110. You can contact the center by calling 858-581-9959. Here is the link to the trails :  http://www.sandiego.gov/park-and-recreation/pdf/tecolotetrailmap.pdf

 

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It is a narrow coastal canyon, named for the many varieties of Owls that live there. It was dedicated on April 1, 1978.  Historically, the Kumeyaay Indians lived there.  There are 6.5 miles of trails for jogging, walking, and mountain biking. There is a garden behind the Nature Center, too. There are entrances off of Claremont Mesa Blvd., Genesse Ave. Mt. Etna Dr., Boyd Ave., and Tecolote Rd.

There are 2 main trails, one is mostly flat for quite awhile and is a dirt and gravel road that turns into mostly dirt and sometimes sand.  This trail ends up running along next to the Golf course before it heads up and down hills. The other trail is quickly off to the right and called the Battle trail. I preferred this one as it is up and down and windy and more through trees and taller vegetation, closer to the side of the canyon.    There are a couple trails that connect the two and a couple access points. The Battle trail joins the main trail as you head more east and north.  Along the way there are other trails that lead up to the top of the canyon walls.  At times you see houses on the hills and other times, especially on the Battle Trail, it feels like you are more out in nature.

Here are some photos of the main trail:

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This is the California Bush Sunflower

2016-02-14-13.55.21.jpg.jpgThis is a Lemonade Berry Bush which can grow up to 10 feet tall. The Natives made a lemonade out of the berries.

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Lovely old tree

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On the trail side of the fence you’ll see California Sage Brush

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This is a tall old Eucalyptus tree

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The Immaculta Parish at the University of San Diego is up on the hill.

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The Golf Course along side the trail.

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Trail that goes up to the Linda Vista area.

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On one hike I walked on the main path then turned around and walked back to catch the Battle Trail at its Northeast entrance.  

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I took this amazing photo where this green light stream showed up in the photo. It didn’t show up in any other photos so I don’t think it has to do with my phone camera, or some reflection, as it goes the entire length of the canyon wall.  Here are two photos, one the main photo and a close up, both without any manipulation or touch up from me. So if you have any ideas what it is let me know in the comment below….energy vortex?  energy stream?  ?????

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I forget the name of these rock balancing sculptures.

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Freeway Iceberg

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 Not sure what these plants are so if you know, let me know.

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Another trail view.

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This is the trail head for the Battle Trail that starts just after you pass the beginning part of the gravel/dirt road main trail that goes next to the enclosed garden behind the nature center.

So if you are in the area, come check it out. You can walk for 40 min, or hours, your choice!

Enjoy!

Hikes Around St. George, Utah

Years ago I lived on the Navajo reservation in NE AZ, working as a teacher. I grew very close to one of my students and kept in touch with her for awhile, then lost touch with her. I attempted to find her for years.  Finally a couple years ago, I found her on Facebook and found that she was living in St. George, Utah with her children.  I decided to go visit to see her and also to tour two resorts in that area.

As a child my family had taken a long road trip from southern AZ, all the way to Banff, Canada, and we hiked some in Zion along the way. So I decided to extend my route a little and drive north to go through Zion National Park. It is an amazing drive.  I didn’t take time to hike it that day, had planned to go back but plans fell through. There are many hikes there though, from easy to very challenging.

 

Zion park Nov 26 2012 9 Zion park Nov 26 2012 4 Zion park Nov 26 2012 5 Zion park Nov 26 2012 6

 

I did take time to hike to Johnson Arch, a little north of town.  It was a beautiful and easy hike.

 

Hike to Johnson Arch 2 Hike to Johnson Arch Nov 29 2012 Johnson Arch Strange beach along Johnson arch hike

 

There are many other places to visit and hike around St. George. What are your favorite hikes there?

McKinleyville, CA Paths

I lived in Northern California from Sept. 1988 to June 1992.  I ended up living in this magical neighborhood. Across the street was a row of houses, beyond that a bluff, beyond that the Mad River, beyond that sand dunes and beyond that…an ocean. At the end of my block was a forest. I could take one path and it led down to the river.  I could take another path and it would lead through a meadow and out to an overlook of the ocean. I used to purposely get lost, exploring various paths and then finding my way back. One time I attempted to walk next to the river, running out of a path, climbing in and out of the branches of trees, attempting to avoid huge banana slugs and finally having to scramble up trees to a  yard on the bluff, walking out with debris trailed throughout my long hair.  I dared myself to learn to walk the forest path at night, feeling the path underneath my feet, no light, finding my way across the meadow and knowing when to stop at the ocean over-look to avoid going off the edge. I returned in Nov. 2012.  The little forest is now more tamed, some paths the same, some re-directed and built up.

Another place I loved to walk was along clam beach.  You can camp there, and walk for miles. I used to go out at night and walk for quite awhile and somehow, know where to cut in through the dunes to find my car once again.  I found fossils in some of the rocks there.  Clam Beach is just north of Mckinleyville. The area is very beautiful with redwood trees, ocean, moose and deer.

 

Old trail made new at end of block Ocean Drive Mckinleyville Nov 7 2012 Clam Beach birds Front yard with deer Mad River and Pacific Ocean in Mckinleyville Nov. 7, 2012

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