Tours, travels, hikes and journeys!

Posts tagged ‘History’

Exploring San Diego Harbor!

Hello Again! 

Last week I decided to take a bus and trolley to the Harbor area of San Diego.  I explored Sea Port Village, the Embarcadero,  Gaslamp Quarter, the Marina and other landmarks along the way. It was quite a gray and somewhat windy day but I was determined to go explore.  Here are some photos!  Click on a photo to get more detail.  Come walk with me!

I took the Green line trolley and got off at Seaport Village station and walked down to Sea Port Village. I passed by the Manchester Grand Hyatt. I remember reading that there is a great view out some floor in the Hyatt, I think, but didn’t check it out.
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I walked toward the water and Seaport Village.  Seaport Village is a shopping/dining complex adjacent to the San Diego Bay, and downtown San Diego.  The address is 849 Harbor Drive.  There are 50+ shops, 17 eateries, and outdoor entertainment.  There is regular live music in some of the cafes, and a free concert series on Sundays. http://www.seaportvillage.com/  I checked out a great bookstore and a magical kite shop. I loved this Carousal and took two photos of it.

I took a photo of this old boat on the water. I don’t know what kind of boat it is or what it is used for but if someone knows, please post a comment.  You can see a Naval Ship behind it as the North Island US Naval Air Station is SW of Sea Port Village, on the Northwest side of Coronado Island.
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After walking around Seaport Village, I headed east to the Embarcadero Marina park area. There are several festivals at the Embarcadero including the yearly Buskr festival. I passed these beautiful trees and a pirate skeleton kite staked to the grass. You’ll have to click on the sky photo to see the kite.  The area you see in the background through the trees is part of Coronado.

Here’s a photo of Seaport Village, looking west to it from the Embarcadero.

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I continued to walk along the Embarcadero . I took a picture of someone on a small motor boat and looking across at the eastern part of Coronado.  Then, I saw a big aircraft carrier heading toward the Coronado bridge. I am assuming it is a Navy ship.  I walked to the end of the West part of the Embarcadero, to watch the ship pass under the Coronado bridge.  In the second picture, you can see the east part of the Embarcadero, and the Coronado Bridge.

I then finished walking around the Western part of the Embarcadero and took a photo of the Convention center, the Marina and you can see the Hilton Hotel to one side.  Then I headed north and turned and took another photo of the Marina and the Marriott Marque hotel towers.

As I headed east, on the Seaport Village boardwalk, I saw this sweet Gazebo surrounded by stores and eateries. 2017-05-19 19.16.52

I headed to Harbor Drive, to walk along the street. I passed this colorful sculpture in front of the Marriott Marina building, then found these great trees planted in front of the Marriott Marque hotel.

I walked along in front of the convention center and looked back at Harbor drive and my attention was caught by the colorful mural that lines part of that street. I don’t know about the tall buildings.

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Lastly, I headed east and then north to the Gaslamp Quarter.  It is an area known for over 200 restaurants, bars, night clubs, lounges, boutiques, art galleries, shops, hotels, entertainment and events.  This area has quite the history.

It was started as William Heath Davis’s New Town, in 1859, when he purchased land to build up San Diego. Before that, the buildings were in Old Town, north of there. Davis believed that the town should be near the water and host a wharf and buildings to support the water traffic.  It didn’t do well and he left and rabbits took over. Then, in 1867 to 1869, Alonzo Horton bought land and started to build more.  He was a little more successful.  He eventually sold land to the city that became a park. The deal was they could pay him a nominal amount each year and if he died, they’d have it to themselves with no payment. He lived a long life though and was paid off. Unfortunately, both Horton and Davis died in poverty, even though they were the ones to “start” the city of San Diego.  The Victorian architecture still exists.  It turned into a red light district for quite awhile. In 1974 revitalization began for the Gaslamp Quarter archway.   It has been revitalized a few times now.  Here is a photo of the archway and another of a what looks to me to be Wiley Coyote sculpture I saw at the entrance to a 5th Ave. Art Gallery.

Hope you have enjoyed the walk today. Come check it out for yourself!
Thanks for reading. Leave a like or a comment and please share these posts with others.

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Fall Stroll Through Old Town, San Diego

A week ago I decided to stroll through Old Town and see what interesting sights I could find.  In several places altars were starting to be created for their Dio De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebration which starts Oct. 29th and goes through Nov. 2nd. http://www.dayofthedeadsd.com/index.html.  Decorated skulls are seen all year in many stores in Old Town. If you are interested in skull jewelry, handbags, back packs, pens, or many other skull items, this is the place to shop 🙂

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But as Dio De Los Muertos decorations start to arrive, you will see more decorated skeletons.  Here is a Mariachi Band dressed for the holiday, welcoming you into an area called Fiesta de Reyes, a group of shops, a restaurant and a stage for various acts throughout the year.

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Here is an elegant “lady” skeleton outside the entrance to Fiesta de Reyes.

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And a couple well dressed “ladies” to welcome you to the Cosmopolitan Hotel and restaurant.

Here is another brightly dressed “lady” in a display in the Fiesta de Reyes courtyard, near this lovely painted wooden bench.

I loved this large wooden horse sculpture outside one of the stores in Fiesta de Reyes.

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Walking outside of Fiesta de Reyes, I spotted this large painted skull, sitting in an old wooden wagon.

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And this lovely fall display set in front of Seeley Stables, a museum that displays old wagons, and other items that are from the era when Old Town was a thriving new town.

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Lastly, on my way back from strolling through other parts of Old Town, I walked through Old Town San Diego State Historic Park and was intrigued by this huge gnarled tree and this sweet yellow blossom on another tree.

I hope you have enjoyed your walk with me and the photos I took.  If you are in the area, come check out Old Town, and see all the history, and/or come and join the celebration of Dio de Los Muertos.

Rainy Trip to Old Town, San Diego, CA

I ended up sick in bed, out for the count, the Monday after Christmas, so this post kept getting delayed. There were visitors in the house over Christmas so I had much to do to get the place ready and things felt too hectic to attempt to write this before Christmas….then there was the post clean up and then….- – – \________ Hope everyone had a wonderful holiday season.

I headed over to Old Town, in the rain, on the 22nd of Dec., to buy just a couple small things for Christmas presents and to be out in the air. While living in Seattle, I got quite tired of the gray and mist, not enjoying the rain like I did while living earlier in No. CA. But here in San Diego, rain is a glorious thing, and I love the feel of the wind and cold. I miss snow, that I loved while living in CO years ago, so this windy rain here will have to do for now until my journey weaves me on to CO.

It felt quite sweet to be out walking before Christmas, enjoying the lovely decorations and the other visitors and shoppers out around me. There are many outside booths in Old Town and most of these were shrouded in heavy vinyl tents, closed up for the day.

I wandered in and out of some stores and found a couple unique small gifts, and enjoyed the conversations I often have with shop-keepers 🙂

When I was walking back toward my car, I took some photos of the gray sky and decorated buildings. Hope you enjoy these. Come along, you can share the walk with me……

First, heading west, we come to the San Diego Union Printing Office and then Casa de Pedrorena de Altamirano.

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The printing office was a pre-fab building shipped from Maine, around Cape Horn, to arrive in San Diego in 1851. I’ve read a historical novel about traveling via ship around Cape Horn. It was quite dangerous weather wise and in many other ways. But this building arrived safely to be built and house the first office of the San Diego Union weekly paper. The first edition was printed on Oct. 10, 1868. It was 4 pages long.

You can still see the original print room with a Washington press, as well as the editor’s office. Entrance is free.

The Altamirano-Pedrorena House was built on a lot purchased by Miquel de Pedronena, from Madrid. He arrived here as a ship’s agent and later married one of the Estudillo daughters in 1842. He claimed this lot which is next to Casa de Estudillo. Sadly, he didn’t live to build a home on the lot as he died in 1850. The home was built in 1869, by his son, Miguel Jr..

In 1871, the home was transferred to Isabel Altamirano, who was Miguel Jr.’s sister, married to Jose Antonio Altamirano. The house remained a family residence until 1907. It is now a rock, gem and jewelry store.

Walking on, we come to the central plaza in Old Town State Historic Park. This park is where San Diego began. It is now a reconstructed setting of life in San Diego in 1821-1872. It became a historic park in 1968. This day it had a lovely display of a taller Christmas tree surrounded by other smaller trees. Pretty huh?

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As we continue walking west we see the Robinson-Rose House, which is now the Visitor’s Center. It is free to explore, too.

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This building was built by James Robinson, who came from Texas in 1850. He established a successful law practice and built this in 1853 not only to house family but also to house office space for the San Diego Herald, the San Diego and Gila Railroad and other private offices. He died in 1857. (ok….that’s 2 of the main inhabitants moving to San Diego and dying in less than 10 years. It must have been a challenging place to live then.). Anyway, Jame’s wife Sarah, sold the building to Louis Rose for a family home. The roof was destroyed in the 1874 fire and fell to ruins. It is now reconstructed and has various displays in it and admission is free.

As we turn right (north), we can see the Barra Barra Saloon. I loved the fire burning in the patio and the pretty decorations.

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As you look ahead, you can see the entrance to Bazaar Del Mundo. As you first walk through this entrance there is a woman selling very yummy roasted and sweetened nuts. Inside the bazaar there are a restaurant, coffee house, stores, and a stage where various groups usually play, when it isn’t raining. I had started my trip here and found some great seasoning in the Temucula Olive Oil company that has a large variety of flavored olive oils, pastas, olives, bath and body products and other items. I found a couple little gifts, too, at the sweet garden shop that is at the north end.

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Hope you enjoyed the walk with me on that gray rainy day. I held you in my heart as I strolled along, in and out of stores, breeze flowing across my face as I stepped outside.

Wishing you a NEW Year, a truly remarkable shift of a year, with the planet transforming into peace, love, abundance, health, joy, cooperation and support for all!

much love, katelon

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San Diego Natural History Museum Films

Last Tuesday I went to see the three films at the San Diego Natural History Museum, located at Balboa Park in San Diego, CA. I had already been through the museum but hadn’t taken the time to see the films so went back specifically to do that. On Free residents Tuesday, the first Tuesday of the month, the cost is $5 for all three films.Otherwise it is the normal admission rate. If you go on Free resident Tuesday you have to stop and pay the $5 to get your ticket for the movies. We had to exit the theater after each movie then get back in line and wait 30-40 min. for the next seating.

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Two of the three films were 3D films. So we all got to wear the silly glasses.

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The first film I watched was one about Dinosaurs, a 3D film, about Dinosaurs in the Alaska area. At times there were violent moments with Dinosaur fights and T-Rex opening his big mouth in 3D so you might consider before bringing very young children. It was a very lush and informative short film.

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The second film I saw was called “Ocean Oasis” about the magical and prolific Baja California ocean area. The film was beautiful and described why the ocean life and bird life is so plentiful there. It was lovely to see huge manta rays, various unusual forms of jelly fish, sharks, and many other different sea creatures.

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The last film was fascinating. It was about Mummies. The film explained why it took so long to figure out how mummies were formed and how this research is used now in hopes for medical cures. It talked of how the famous mummies were uncovered, why they were created in the first place and how they have been brought to safe places for all to see. I especially enjoyed the views of the various temples. This film was 3D also.

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So if you happen to be in San Diego, come check out this wonderful museum and the movies. This website lists more about the museum, its ongoing research, what exhibits and films are presently being shown, prices, etc. There is a lovely gift shop there and also a snack bar.

http://sdnhm.org/

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