Tours, travels, hikes and journeys!

Archive for May, 2015

Presidio Park and Serra Museum

April 30th, I explored parts of Presidio Park and the Serra Museum. The museum wasn’t open so I walked around it, taking pictures of it. I found out later that it is only open on the weekends right now. I hope you enjoy these photos!

In 1769, a Spanish Franciscan missionary, along with a group of soldiers led by Gaspa de Portola established Alta California, at this site.  This was the first mission and fort (Presidio) established in CA and is considered the site where San Diego began. I also read reports that stated it was the first site to establish California. The mission was moved in 1773 to another site east of here, as it had a more ready access to water.  Presidio park consists of 40 acres.

This land was originally the home of the Kumeyaay Indians, who strongly resisted Christianity. They gave up their land and the mission and fort were built. There was a battalion of Mormons who arrived in San Diego, in 1847, to help the military.  They brought with them irrigation knowledge and brick making knowledge and helped create more friendly relations with the Indians and other indigenous cultures.

In 1928-1929, the Serra Museum was built to house and showcase the collections of the San Diego History Center.  William Templeton Johnson, the architect, chose the Spanish revival architecture to align with the buildings designed in Balboa Park for the Panama-California exposition.  The History Center was started by George Marston, a local business owner and philanthropist, who built the museum and donated it and the land to the city. In 1982 the San Diego History Center moved to Balboa park and now the Serra Museum is used as an auxiliary museum and educational center.  The museum is also rented out for various events.

The park and the museum have a history of paranormal activity and hauntings and this interesting site has some links to that information:

http://hiddensandiego.net/presidio-park-historical-spots.php

Here are some pictures of the museum:

The east side, the north side, and the long view of the southwest and west side looking north:

wpid-2015-05-02-21.32.58.jpg.jpegwpid-2015-05-02-21.34.11.jpg.jpegwpid-2015-05-02-21.35.28.jpg.jpeg

View west from the museum (ocean in the distance),  and the view of the west side of the museum.

wpid-2015-05-02-21.41.20.jpg.jpeg

  wpid-2015-05-02-21.44.42.jpg.jpeg

Here’s an old wine press, and a view of the walkway on the west with views to the northeast:

wpid-2015-05-02-21.38.09.jpg.jpegwpid-2015-05-02-21.36.59.jpg.jpeg

Here’s a plaque about the museum, on the west side, and one at the entrance, recognizing George Marston:

wpid-2015-05-02-21.43.30.jpg.jpegwpid-2015-05-02-21.39.40.jpg.jpeg

This is a cross commemorating Father Junipero Serra with the date 7/16/1769:

wpid-2015-05-02-21.51.00.jpg.jpeg

And two lovely sculptures made by Arthur Putnam, The Padre, which is close to the parking lot and another sculpture that is on the north side of Presidio Drive as you drive up toward the museum:

wpid-2015-05-02-21.48.51.jpg.jpegwpid-2015-05-02-21.46.50.jpg.jpeg

As you drive further up, there is an area that commemorates the men and women of the Mormon Battalion:

wpid-2015-05-02-21.15.07.jpg.jpegwpid-2015-05-02-21.17.39.jpg.jpeg

wpid-2015-05-02-21.21.04.jpg.jpegwpid-2015-05-02-21.23.21.jpg.jpeg

wpid-2015-05-02-21.24.48.jpg.jpegwpid-2015-05-02-21.27.22.jpg.jpeg

As I hiked up the hill from the parking lot and lower two statues, toward the Mormon area, I spied 3 rabbits and this beautiful Eucalyptus tree:

wpid-2015-05-02-21.30.20.jpg.jpegwpid-2015-05-02-21.05.33.jpg.jpeg

All in all, even though I didn’t get into the museum, it was a lovely walk, with hills to climb. I’ve heard that the hiking/walking trails in the area are wonderful, too, and there are picnic tables in some areas, plus lots of grass to lay down on for rest and reading.

So come check it out!!!

Advertisements
Video

Cinco de Mayo Concert in the Park, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA

Most of my time and energy these last numerous months has gone into intensifying my ongoing work to assist in the transformation of the planet. So I’ve been doing very deep spiritual work 24/7. So when I do get out, I go to my familiar places….Pacific/Mission Beach, Old Town San Diego and Balboa Park, or just walk in the neighborhood. Once the shift comes for the planet, I will be moving on and this blog will get more varied. So thanks for hanging in there 🙂 I’m grateful though that at least between these four locations, I always find interesting and beautiful things to see and enjoy and I hope you enjoy them, too.

Yesterday, I went to the Natural History Museum to see the latest addition to their movies. This is a photo, badly out of focus, sorry, of the poster for the latest new film, “Tiny Giants”. It was 3D, beautifully filmed and a sweet story about the life of a young chipmunk, preparing for winter in the cold forest and a grasshopper field mouse venturing out for the first time, in the venomous Sonora desert and both of them trying to avoid the dangers in their environments.

wpid-2015-05-06-16.24.31.jpg.jpeg

When walking out of the museum I noticed this model of a Great White Shark:

wpid-2015-05-06-16.22.25.jpg.jpeg

I have walked Balboa Park often but never noticed the sculptures of the naked women that look to be holding up the roof of the San Diego History Museum:

wpid-2015-05-06-16.20.01-1.jpg.jpeg

I took a break to eat my packed picnic dinner and read and then headed over to the Cinco de Mayo Concert in the park. I got there to hear some of the practicing, as the crowd started to fill in the seats. The concert showcases students from San Diego State University and is put on by the Kiwanis Club of San Diego and supported by other donors as well. It is also a fund raiser to raise scholarship funds for students.

During the concert there were some great remarks shared about the importance and history of Cinco de Mayo and the contribution to the US made by the 1862 victory at Puebla in Mexico when the much smaller and under resourced army beat the undefeated for 50 years and much bigger French army.

The first group to play and sing was the SDSU Mariachi group:

wpid-2015-05-06-16.13.58.jpg.jpeg

The next group to sing was the SDSU Cinco de Mayo Choir:

wpid-2015-05-06-16.06.09-1.jpg.jpeg

Here’s a little shaky video of them singing “Sway (Quien Sera):

The next group to play was the SDSU Jazz Enzemble:

wpid-2015-05-06-16.04.24.jpg.jpeg

And here they are playing a somewhat long but interesting piece, “The Goombay Smash” by Steve Owen, and it alternates between a salsa and sambo beat:

Lastly the group got back together, with everyone on stage, to do two more numbers:

wpid-2015-05-06-16.02.35.jpg.jpeg

I love Latin music and culture, studied Salsa dancing and grew up around Latin culture so love the music. All the groups were very talented.

I took this last shot of this very uninhibited little girl who stood up to the side of the stage, amongst the columns and danced the entire concert:

wpid-2015-05-06-16.11.12-1.jpg.jpeg

It was a lovely afternoon and evening and as I walked back to my car through the ends of the sunset, I was grateful to have this refuge in the city to welcome me and give me respite during the intensity of the work I am presently doing.

If you get a chance, come check out Balboa Park and it’s many offerings and the musical skills of the students at San Diego State University.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: